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Toppler Of Tyrants: How Harvard Turned A Scared Teenager Into A Founding Father

John Adams was one of the Founding Fathers and second President of the United States of America. Before entering politics, Adams (1735-1826) worked as a teacher and lawyer. Brilliant, patriotic, and blunt, Adams became a critic of British authority in colonial America, which resulted in him assuming a leadership role in the Continental Congress.

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Harvard’s Most Indomitable Student, Ever

Blind and deaf as an infant, Helen Keller became internationally-renowned for her work as a writer, lecturer, political activist, and pioneer for people with disabilities. With the help of her childhood teacher and longtime companion Anne Sullivan, Keller first learned to communicate through a finger alphabet system…

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Chronicler Of U.S. Presidents, Doris Kearns Goodwin Offers Solace To Harvard Community

Over the years, Doris Kearns Goodwin has written some of the most popular and critically acclaimed books about U.S. politics and the complicated personalities who helped shape it. Goodwin’s books, which regularly reach the top of the New York Times Bestseller list, include several biographies of U.S. presidents, including Lyndon Johnson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin Roosevelt…

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W.E.B. Du Bois: Harvard’s First Black PhD Holder

Born in 1868, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was a noted scholar, editor, and activist who fought discrimination and racism throughout his life. After graduating valedictorian from his Massachusetts high school in 1884, Du Bois attended Fisk University in Tennessee, where he was first exposed to the harsh realities of Jim Crow segregation…

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Former UN Head Ban Ki-moon Receives Top Harvard Honors For Lifelong Service

Among the most respected and accomplished statesmen of his generation, Ban Ki-moon is best known for serving as the eighth Secretary-General of the United Nations from 2007 to 2016. Born in the Republic of Korea in 1944, Ban helped steer the UN through a volatile period that included the Arab Spring, nuclear pursuits in Iran and North Korea…

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Harvard’s Ruth Simmons Shatters Ivy League Ceilings

In 2001, Ruth Simmons made the history books when she took the helm at Brown University and thus became the first African American president of an Ivy League institution. Before Brown, Simmons served six years as president of Smith College, where she launched a number of important academic initiatives, including the very first engineering program at a women’s college in America…

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