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Vint Cerf, Original Internet Surfer, Developed Groundbreaking Technological Infrastructure At Stanford

Widely known as one of the “Fathers of the Internet,” Vint Cerf is a pioneering computer scientist who helped launch the world wide web. In 1973, while working as a professor at Stanford University, Cerf and a team member began the design of a revolutionary TCP/IP protocol suite, which essentially allows electronic devices to transmit data over long distances…

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Stanford University Alum And WhatsApp Co-Founder Returns To Discuss The Implications Of Balancing Profit With Privacy

After working for some of the biggest companies in Silicon Valley, Brian Acton finally struck gold as the Co-founder of the messaging startup WhatsApp. After college, Acton flitted between jobs in the tech industry as a systems administrator for Rockwell International and as a product tester for both Apple and Adobe Systems…

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For Rachel Maddow, Stanford Provided The Foundation Of Her Search For Truth

For many American television viewers, their nightly news is highlighted by the informed and trusted reporting of Rachel Maddow, MSNBC’s prime-time progressive voice. She broke barriers when she joined the network, becoming the first openly LGBTQ host of a major network news program, and coining the controversy-cliffhanger phrase, “watch this space…

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Ex-Microsoft MVP Steve Ballmer Teaches Stanford Students The Lessons He Learned

It’s been over 40 years since Steve Ballmer left the Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB) behind to join Bill Gates’ startup, Microsoft, and it’s safe to say his decision was wise. The two former Harvard classmates would become instrumental to each other’s success, with Ballmer serving as Gates’ personal assistant and voice of reason—the only person who could persuade the young visionary to delegate anything to somebody else…

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Google Co-Founder Larry Page Puts Stanford On The Front Page Of Internet Innovation

Since the early 1980s, America’s hub of technological innovation has been centralized in a small swath of land surrounding San Francisco Bay, more commonly known as Silicon Valley. Central to the area’s growth—and the 20th century American tech boom—is Stanford University, the private research university that has smashed the notion of the elite East Coast and Ivy League superiority…

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